Clubhouse for Brands? Using Social Audio for Storytelling

Clubhouse for Brands? Using Social Audio for Storytelling

Using social audio or Clubhouse for brands is one of many channels to tell your story, build brand awareness and drive customer advocacy.

By: Michael Brito

Category: Content & Storytelling

Clubhouse for brands? Maybe or maybe not. But social audio for brand storytelling is here to stay. Watch this video or read the transcripts below.

Back in 2013 I wrote a book called Your Brand: The Next Media Company. It was a blueprint that organizations can use to transform the way they create content and become a real-time publisher. At that time, it was very difficult to reach consumers with brand messages. Today it’s almost impossible.

Here’s why:

  • There is a content and media surplus. There is no shortage of advertising messages, notifications, likes, text messages, emails, all vying for our attention.
  • There is an attention deficit. The human brain can only process and consume a finite amount of information at any given moment in time. And, the variance between the surplus of content and attention deficit is only growing.
  • We have tunnel vision. This is our defense mechanism in order to maintain a level of sanity and consume only the content that we find relevant at that precise moment in time we ignore everything else.
  • The buyer’s journey is dynamic and unpredictable. As consumers, we walk through our daily lives consuming content differently, leveraging buying triggers that we can never predict.

All four of these factors makes combined makes it almost impossible for brands to reach their audiences with content that drives action. The book is broken down by three sections-people, process and technology. If you have ever worked in project management or explored Six Sigma, you’ll recognize these three pillars to describe a framework.

  • People: This really revolves around building an agile team that could create content in real time, similar to a newsroom.
  • Process: This was more about building editorial and creative workflows so that content can go through the supply chain from ideation, to creation, to publish and then to amplification quickly. I called this the content supply chain.
  • Platforms: This was about the investment in technology that can facilitate this entire process.

In the book, I also talk about the need for brands to diversify content. I reference what is called the Cone of Learning which is a model that was developed in the early 1900s by Edgar Dale. It then became the Cone of Experience, also known as the Learning Pyramid. The model incorporates several theories related to education and learning styles. During the 1960s, Dale theorized that learners retain more information by what they “do” as opposed to what is “heard”, “read” or “observed”.

While the Cone of Experience was developed contextually around learning styles, there is an application to content marketing. While the numbers may not be scientifically proven, this is a good model that reinforces the need for brands to tell consistent stories across a multitude of channels, and in a variety of different ways. Below is where Clubhouse for brands falls on the storytelling spectrum.

Clubhouse for Brands

When I first wrote the book back in 2013, podcasting was around but it wasn’t as popular as it is today. And now with the explosion of Clubhouse, there’s already a conversation from some pundits that social audio platforms will soon make podcasting obsolete.

Whatever the market demands, social audio in some form or another will be critical piece of the brand storytelling mix. Several data points from Boston Consulting Group and Edelman over the last several years have illustrated that consumers must interact with a brand message three to five times before they buy or believe. This means that surround sounding audiences with consistent and relevant storytelling must be a priority for brands.

It’s also important to add that social audio, long-form content, video, etc., is just the vehicle that delivers messages into the marketplace. What’s more important is the story. The message … the narrative that explains who you are, what you stand for, and why others should care.

Clubhouse for brands isn’t the right question. The questions you have to ask yourself is whether or not you are meeting the demands of your audience with your supply of stories. And if you are, the market will also dictate where they want to hear those stories and where they will resonate the most.

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